Volvo Cars Invests In Ride Sharing For Kids

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Volvo Cars Invests In Ride Sharing For Kids

With so many disruptive technologies being introduced in the market, it pays to get ahead of the trend in any way you can. Ride sharing has been perhaps one of the largest changes to our market in recent years, with the efficacy of such services leading many buyers to completely forgo the idea of personal vehicle ownership - especially in more congested parts of the world.

In light of this, Volvo has teamed up with California-based ride sharing company Zūm, which is a ride sharing service for children. Founded back in 2015, the company has grown rapidly in providing a network of vetted drivers to parents and schools in order to allow them to schedule transport for the regular school commutes. It definitely beats a school bus or a driver, and can be far more cost effective as well.

This unique subset of ride sharing is also paired with other services such as child care before or after a ride as needed - no need for parents to go hunting for a babysitter for their kids if they're out at work. Drivers are vetted in a far more rigorous fashion than regular ride sharing applications, as are their vehicles, as you would expect when it comes to the safety of children. Everything else is par for the course for a ride sharing app, with quick rider-driver pairings and efficient routing.

Where Volvo Cars comes in is with funding as part of their Tech Fund investments. Zūm may be popular in California but they will need more resources to expand across the United States and possibly the world. For now this is the extent of Volvo Cars' contribution, but they may consider adding Zūm to their list of Care by Volvo services as part of the premium subscription plan, or to provide fleet vehicles for usage.



Aswan

Aswan

Writer

Places more value in how fun a car is to drive than outright performance or luxury. He laments the direction that automotive development is headed in, but grudgingly accepts the logic behind it. Can be commonly found trying to fix yet another problem on his rusty project car.


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